• BUSINESS SCHOOL: ANOTHER PATH TO CAREERS IN TECHNOLOGY

    Are you one of those who has heard enviously about all the e

    BUSINESS SCHOOL: ANOTHER PATH TO CAREERS IN TECHNOLOGY

    Are you one of those who has heard enviously about all the exciting career opportunities in technology—but thought, “That’s not for me. I don’t plan to pursue a degree in engineering or computer science.” If so, I have good news for you. There is another door into the technology industry: business school.

    I know that may sound counterintuitive, at first. Many people assume a stereotypical role of business executives in an organization: that they’re the people in suits who don’t really understand technology, but somehow have to manage and oversee the “techies” and brainiacs who run the IT operation.

    Actually, countless college students across the country are now preparing for lucrative careers in technology by earning their undergraduate business degrees. They’re doing it through studies in a discipline commonly called Information Systems (IS).

  • The New Face of American Business

    From the church he grew up in to his family owned restaurant

    The New Face of American Business

    From the church he grew up in to his family owned restaurant in which Civil Rights leaders gathered, Todd A. Gray’s roots are intricately tied to the city of Atlanta.

    Unlike some minority experiences in other communities, he said he felt lucky to see successful people in Atlanta who looked like him: African-American mayors, lawyers, doctors and more. If they could reach for the sky, so could he.

    When a major career opportunity knocked in 2013, Gray opened the door, departed his head supplier diversity position with a fortune 50 company in Rhode Island and found himself back in the hometown he loves. One of the largest health systems in the U.S., Atlanta-based Grady Health System recruited Gray to be its director of supplier diversity.

  • How to Approach your Business Finances with confidence

    It shouldn’t come as a surprise to most entrepreneurs that

    How to Approach your Business Finances with confidence

    It shouldn’t come as a surprise to most entrepreneurs that starting a business is a challenging endeavor. In fact, a recent study from World Bank, Facebook and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (https://www.inc.com/leigh-buchanan/why-its-so-hard-tostart-a-business-in-the-us.html) found that the U.S. ranked 51 out of 190 countries when it comes to the ease of starting a business, a ranking that weighs factors such as procedures, time and one of the biggest hurdles: costs.

    Over the course of my career—from working as a branch manager at a bank to my current role as director of Access to Capital at the Women’s Business Development Center (WBDC)—I’ve witnessed firsthand how difficult it can be for individuals to navigate the process of requesting the right amount of capital for their small business.

  • More than a Magazine

    It was February and Reno, Nevada, already blanketed by a lat

    More than a Magazine

    It was February and Reno, Nevada, already blanketed by a late-season snowfall, was bracing for several feet more.

    There were 20 of us: small business owners, solo entrepreneurs, nonprofit executives and Fortune 500 diversity professionals, representing a range of industries from across the country: advertising, automotive and banking to construction, consulting and healthcare. And we were settling into a cavernous lodge for the fourth annual Diversity Professionals Connect (DPC) 2018 Summit an intimate, invitation-only retreat hosted by Melissa Simmons, Diversity Professional magazine publisher, president and CEO.

    Launched in 2015, DPC’s mission is to “connect people, explore opportunities and build relationships.” Unofficially, its job is to dispense with the niceties that clutter business networking. It’s about pulling back the curtain on all segments of diversity and where they’re headed. It’s about the future of diverse entrepreneurs and professionals. And, with stark candor, it’s about economic survival, the closed-door struggles with worklife balance, the drive for success and the fear of failure.