• DIVERSIFY YOUR TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PORTFOLIO

    Much of my best career performances occurred when I worked f

    DIVERSIFY YOUR TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PORTFOLIO

    Much of my best career performances occurred when I worked for managers I did not want to disappoint. Coincidence? Not even close. I’ve had managers who took an interest in my development and I’ve had managers who threw furniture across the room. While you learn from both (how NOT to do something can be a powerful lesson), let’s assume none of us aspire to be furniture throwers. People tend to care more about (and work harder for) people who think they are worth investing in.

    So much has been written about being a good leader, manager, motivator, etc., etc., etc. Where does one even begin to hone leadership skills? The good news is that you can make a real impact and it costs little to nothing to kick it off.

  • The Real Diversity Stars of Atlanta

    There’s no secret that Americans are obsessed with reality

    The Real Diversity Stars of Atlanta

    There’s no secret that Americans are obsessed with reality television shows. Although castmates do little more than portray themselves, millions tune in to watch these ordinary people revel in their celebrity status and the rewards of high salaries, fabulous fashions and millions of adoring fans.

    Not everyone who is deserving receives this level of recognition and rewards, which is why we are aiming our camera on 11 of diversity’s top influencers. Although these ladies are in Atlanta, their reach is global. They are some of the country’s most sought-after leaders in supplier diversity and diversity and inclusion. They are leaders of some of the most progressive and successful corporate programs, diversity advocacy organizations and diversity consultancies. Collectively, these diversity stars are credited with hundreds of millions of dollars in diverse supplier contracts and have impacted the work lives of thousands of diverse employees. They don’t have cameras following them daily, but they are well respected and celebrated by the many people who benefit from their professional work and passion for community. We introduce profiles of “The Real Diversity Stars of Atlanta.”

  • Wassel Lewis Champions Diversity at Aflac and Beyond

    Wassel Lewis believes that since we live in a country that i

    Wassel Lewis Champions Diversity at Aflac and Beyond

    Wassel Lewis believes that since we live in a country that is extremely diverse, it makes sense to have a workforce and supplier base that reflects that diversity. As director of Strategic Sourcing and Procurement at Aflac, his vision is to instill that notion and make it part of the company’s overall business plan and culture going forward.

    “Supplier diversity is extremely important to Aflac because we believe it’s the right thing to do for the communities in which we serve. However, it is also a business consideration. Today’s marketplace is as diverse as it has ever been, and we want to reflect that in our workforce and through the suppliers that represent our brand. It is a key pillar of our overall growth strategy,” Lewis said.

  • Effectively Adapting Your Leadership Skills After A Major Career Change

    Now, more than ever, professionals are looking for change. T

    Effectively Adapting Your Leadership Skills After A Major Career Change

    Now, more than ever, professionals are looking for change. The Indeed Hiring Lab reports that 86 percent of individuals who are already employed but seeking new jobs are looking for work outside their current profession.

    It may not surprise you that younger workers are changing jobs but, research has found, even those reaching retirement age are interested in a career change. A study reported by Prevention magazine found a growing number of people see their 40s, 50s and 60s as the right time to move to an entirely different profession. People are also working longer. Prevention reports 79 percent of baby boomers expect to work at least part-time after retirement.

    Whether it’s millennials or baby boomers, people are changing careers for many reasons. Some are seeking new opportunities or higher earnings. According to a LinkedIn survey, the primary reason people change jobs is for career advancement, followed closely by dissatisfaction with leadership or the work environment. Another survey suggests 42 percent of professionals leave their job due to stress. Some people starting a new career later in life, or even retirement, may share these motivations but others, like me, may see this time as a chance for them to pursue their passion.