• Women Drive Economic Success for All

    Continue to invest in female employment and entrepreneurship

    Women Drive Economic Success for All

    Continue to invest in female employment and entrepreneurship to push our economy to new levels

    Whether it’s as a business owner or in the workforce, women are driving local economies and contributing to business competitiveness on a national level. But if we fail to harness women’s business potential, we may be shortchanging our economy.

    A recent study from Dr. Amanda Weinstein, University of Akron, reported local wages (for men and women) rise when more women enter the workforce. Between 1980 and 2010, Weinstein’s research found that every 10 percent increase in female labor participation led to a five percent increase in average real wages—the amount workers take home after accounting for inflation.

    In other words, in cities that had more female workforce participation in 1980, Weinstein found men and women made higher average hourly wages in 2010. Weinstein also found the impact of female workforce participation was heightened when women were not segregated into low paying, female-dominated occupations.

  • Leadership and Diversity: It starts in the classroom

    Leadership in business starts in the classroom, long before

    Leadership and Diversity: It starts in the classroom

    Leadership in business starts in the classroom, long before it is exercised in the boardroom. But when it comes to diversity, our nation’s higher education faces a leadership gap, similar to that in the boardroom, and both must be closed. The college classroom is where tomorrow’s leaders—today’s students—are inspired, motivated, educated and prepared for careers.

    Hiring managers at most major companies will tell you, unfortunately, that the young talent pool coming out of colleges, today, is not as diverse as they would like it to be. Across all business disciplines, and in academia, there is a collective agreement: our country needs more African-Americans, Latinos and Native-Americans to study business and similar professions. With today’s global marketplace, and our increasingly multicultural domestic footprint, there are lucrative career opportunities awaiting business graduates. Companies know that a diverse workforce produces a diversity of ideas and a level of innovation that will outpace its competitors.

  • Shell Energizes Supplier Diversity Initiative

    When you’ve been one of the industry leaders in divers

    Shell Energizes Supplier Diversity Initiative

    When you’ve been one of the industry leaders in diversity for more than 40 years, it can be easy to become used to winning and lose your competitive fire. Year after year of meeting or outperforming your goals can make even the most astute achievers a bit complacent. Fortunately, that’s not the case oil and gas energy leader Shell Oil Company finds itself in with its supplier diversity program. However, after taking a long hard look at its past successes and setting a vision for new goals and achievements, the company has hit refresh and is retooling its supplier diversity practices.

    One of the first things Shell has done is to create an executive steering team, chaired by the company’s U.S. Country Chair and President Bruce Culpepper and driven by leaders of the company’s major U.S. businesses. According to Debra Stewart, director, Supplier Diversity and Diversity Outreach, these company executives have partnered with the leadership of the procurement team to develop supplier diversity growth strategies for all of Shell’s U.S. businesses.

  • UNCONSCIOUS BIASES AND THE WORKPLACE

    The most noted bias discussed in the workplace is discrimina

    UNCONSCIOUS BIASES AND THE WORKPLACE

    The most noted bias discussed in the workplace is discrimination. However, there is another type known as unconscious bias.

    This implicit bias involves the attitudes, stereotypes or prejudice that impact our actions, decisions and behaviors in our unconscious minds. The difference with this bias and overt discrimination is that we are unaware of it, and it happens outside of our control—accidental discrimination toward a person or group.

    Have you ever made a quick judgement or assessment of a person/people and/or situation? Your brain automatically triggers a response influenced by your background, personal experiences and life or cultural experiences.

    Impact in the Workplace

    Unconscious bias appears in many forms. Simply put, it is favoring one group over another, and it occurs at all levels.

    However, it can have the greatest impact with high-ranking individuals and those responsible for or who have great influence over the wellbeing of others. With that said, it can have devastating consequences to the individuals or groups who are the targets for such biases. The workplace difficulty can often be tied to this bias.

    Examples of the impacts of unconscious biases can be seen in:

    • • Hiring and promotions
    • • Assessing and providing feedback
    • • Job satisfaction
    • • Marketing campaigns
    • • Treatment of customers/stakeholders
    • • Mentoring
    • • Leadership selection

    How to Address

    First, recognize that we are all naturally biased. The key is to mitigate or remove our biases.

    We can do that by:

    • • Awareness: Focus on fair treatment and respect. Your plan to ensure this happens and the expectations of every member of the organization.
    • • Recognize Your Own Biases: Assess your actions, decisions and behaviors to acknowledge your personal biases.
    • • Provide Training: Educate to change behaviors away from bias and discrimination.
    • • Change Thinking: Expose and address unconscious biases by being more conscious in your thinking and more deliberate in efforts to check your responses.
    • • Inclusion: Make a conscious effort to ensure all are included or considered.
    • • Improve Processes, Policies and Procedures: Ensure the structure of the organization does not permit biases.