• THE SECRETS TO WINNING BUY-IN

    Let’s face the facts: diversity and inclusion (D&I) pr

    THE SECRETS TO WINNING BUY-IN

    Let’s face the facts: diversity and inclusion (D&I) practitioners need other people’s active support in order to have lasting impact. But, sometimes we forget just how much we need others to get our work done. We must create strategic partnerships among a variety of stakeholders if we’re going to make meaningful change. Success requires buy-in from the following groups:

    Leadership—C-suite, high-level managers, and organizational boards—are crucial for creating cultural shifts within organizations. These might not be the first people you engage, but they are the most important. You’ll need enthusiastic official endorsement of D&I activities and the designation of appropriate resources to see them through.

  • Women Drive Economic Success for All

    Continue to invest in female employment and entrepreneurship

    Women Drive Economic Success for All

    Continue to invest in female employment and entrepreneurship to push our economy to new levels

    Whether it’s as a business owner or in the workforce, women are driving local economies and contributing to business competitiveness on a national level. But if we fail to harness women’s business potential, we may be shortchanging our economy.

    A recent study from Dr. Amanda Weinstein, University of Akron, reported local wages (for men and women) rise when more women enter the workforce. Between 1980 and 2010, Weinstein’s research found that every 10 percent increase in female labor participation led to a five percent increase in average real wages—the amount workers take home after accounting for inflation.

    In other words, in cities that had more female workforce participation in 1980, Weinstein found men and women made higher average hourly wages in 2010. Weinstein also found the impact of female workforce participation was heightened when women were not segregated into low paying, female-dominated occupations.

  • Leadership and Diversity: It starts in the classroom

    Leadership in business starts in the classroom, long before

    Leadership and Diversity: It starts in the classroom

    Leadership in business starts in the classroom, long before it is exercised in the boardroom. But when it comes to diversity, our nation’s higher education faces a leadership gap, similar to that in the boardroom, and both must be closed. The college classroom is where tomorrow’s leaders—today’s students—are inspired, motivated, educated and prepared for careers.

    Hiring managers at most major companies will tell you, unfortunately, that the young talent pool coming out of colleges, today, is not as diverse as they would like it to be. Across all business disciplines, and in academia, there is a collective agreement: our country needs more African-Americans, Latinos and Native-Americans to study business and similar professions. With today’s global marketplace, and our increasingly multicultural domestic footprint, there are lucrative career opportunities awaiting business graduates. Companies know that a diverse workforce produces a diversity of ideas and a level of innovation that will outpace its competitors.

  • Shell Energizes Supplier Diversity Initiative

    When you’ve been one of the industry leaders in divers

    Shell Energizes Supplier Diversity Initiative

    When you’ve been one of the industry leaders in diversity for more than 40 years, it can be easy to become used to winning and lose your competitive fire. Year after year of meeting or outperforming your goals can make even the most astute achievers a bit complacent. Fortunately, that’s not the case oil and gas energy leader Shell Oil Company finds itself in with its supplier diversity program. However, after taking a long hard look at its past successes and setting a vision for new goals and achievements, the company has hit refresh and is retooling its supplier diversity practices.

    One of the first things Shell has done is to create an executive steering team, chaired by the company’s U.S. Country Chair and President Bruce Culpepper and driven by leaders of the company’s major U.S. businesses. According to Debra Stewart, director, Supplier Diversity and Diversity Outreach, these company executives have partnered with the leadership of the procurement team to develop supplier diversity growth strategies for all of Shell’s U.S. businesses.