• How to see and support “Invisible” Diversity

    Fresh on the heels of Mental Illness Awareness Week (https:/

    How to see and support “Invisible” Diversity

    Fresh on the heels of Mental Illness Awareness Week (https://www.nami.org/Get-Involved/Awareness-Events/Mental-Illness-Awareness-Week), I recalled how the recent suicides of designer Kate Spade and celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain highlighted unseen issues that can affect people whom we think we know. In reality, mental health is just one of the “invisible” diversity issues, or private identities, that affect people every day.

    You or a coworker might be a survivor of sexual assault, cancer or criminal gang affiliation. Other issues include substance use disorder, or prior incarceration. All of these are the types of private identities people often are unwilling to discuss, even though they impact the workplace experience as much as race, gender and other more obvious identities.

  • THE SECRETS TO WINNING BUY-IN

    Let’s face the facts: diversity and inclusion (D&I) pr

    THE SECRETS TO WINNING BUY-IN

    Let’s face the facts: diversity and inclusion (D&I) practitioners need other people’s active support in order to have lasting impact. But, sometimes we forget just how much we need others to get our work done. We must create strategic partnerships among a variety of stakeholders if we’re going to make meaningful change. Success requires buy-in from the following groups:

    Leadership—C-suite, high-level managers, and organizational boards—are crucial for creating cultural shifts within organizations. These might not be the first people you engage, but they are the most important. You’ll need enthusiastic official endorsement of D&I activities and the designation of appropriate resources to see them through.

  • Women Drive Economic Success for All

    Continue to invest in female employment and entrepreneurship

    Women Drive Economic Success for All

    Continue to invest in female employment and entrepreneurship to push our economy to new levels

    Whether it’s as a business owner or in the workforce, women are driving local economies and contributing to business competitiveness on a national level. But if we fail to harness women’s business potential, we may be shortchanging our economy.

    A recent study from Dr. Amanda Weinstein, University of Akron, reported local wages (for men and women) rise when more women enter the workforce. Between 1980 and 2010, Weinstein’s research found that every 10 percent increase in female labor participation led to a five percent increase in average real wages—the amount workers take home after accounting for inflation.

    In other words, in cities that had more female workforce participation in 1980, Weinstein found men and women made higher average hourly wages in 2010. Weinstein also found the impact of female workforce participation was heightened when women were not segregated into low paying, female-dominated occupations.

  • Leadership and Diversity: It starts in the classroom

    Leadership in business starts in the classroom, long before

    Leadership and Diversity: It starts in the classroom

    Leadership in business starts in the classroom, long before it is exercised in the boardroom. But when it comes to diversity, our nation’s higher education faces a leadership gap, similar to that in the boardroom, and both must be closed. The college classroom is where tomorrow’s leaders—today’s students—are inspired, motivated, educated and prepared for careers.

    Hiring managers at most major companies will tell you, unfortunately, that the young talent pool coming out of colleges, today, is not as diverse as they would like it to be. Across all business disciplines, and in academia, there is a collective agreement: our country needs more African-Americans, Latinos and Native-Americans to study business and similar professions. With today’s global marketplace, and our increasingly multicultural domestic footprint, there are lucrative career opportunities awaiting business graduates. Companies know that a diverse workforce produces a diversity of ideas and a level of innovation that will outpace its competitors.