GLOBAL CAUSE, LOCAL EFFECT: MAKING A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE IN ONE LINE

Sometimes world events can have very local consequences. For Merck Associate Director of Global Economic Inclusion & Supplier Diversity, Raul Suarez-Rodriguez, that’s exactly what happened…and at a very tender age.   “I grew up in Pinar Del Rio, a very beautiful, tobacco-rich province in western Cuba. And everything was great up until I was about ...

By Arthur Schurr

GLOBAL CAUSE, LOCAL EFFECT: MAKING A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE IN ONE LINE

Sometimes world events can have very local consequences. For Merck Associate Director of Global Economic Inclusion & Supplier Diversity, Raul Suarez-Rodriguez, that’s exactly what happened…and at a very tender age.
 
“I grew up in Pinar Del Rio, a very beautiful, tobacco-rich province in western Cuba. And everything was great up until I was about 10 years old. My mother was a doctor and my father was a senior executive at an epidemiology center. So, both of my parents were professionals. But in 1990, when the Soviet Union was about to collapse, its relationship with Cuba started going downhill. That changed everything. There were shortages of just about every necessity. Electricity blackouts began. Sometimes we’d go 24 hours straight without power. Food was scarce and limited. There were times when all we had to eat were rice and avocados. And we were better off than most. That’s when people really started to leave.”

About Us

Diversity Professional (DP) is an interactive national publication complemented with strategic offline engagements that focus on business, career and lifestyle. We deliver essential information for entrepreneurs and professionals related to business strategies, career development, education, economics and social trends. DP is the magazine for achievers, the voice of modern executives and the playbook for business ...

Diversity Professional

About Us

Diversity Professional (DP) is an interactive national publication complemented with strategic offline engagements that focus on business, career and lifestyle. We deliver essential information for entrepreneurs and professionals related to business strategies, career development, education, economics and social trends.

DP is the magazine for achievers, the voice of modern executives and the playbook for business owners, millennials and seasoned professionals. Serving as an ongoing resource throughout one’s professional career, DP understands the value of long-term relationships and what it takes to guide our readers to success. We connect people, possibilities and partners that build businesses and drive the economy.  DP is dedicated to creating positive change in diversity and inclusion initiatives. By raising awareness and sharing expertise across multiple industries.


Mission Statement

Diversity Professional mission is to advance economic inclusion for underrepresented groups by focusing on issues that impact employment, entrepreneurship and business.  We engage, inspire, celebrate, educate and connect diverse professionals and entrepreneurs to opportunities that elevate their careers and businesses.

7 WAYS TO CREATE ECONOMIC INCLUSION FOR MINORITY-OWNED BUSINESSES

Inclusive economics is the concept of ensuring that those who are part of historically disenfranchised, marginalized and disadvantaged communities have the same opportunity to engage in capitalism and successful entrepreneurship. When people speak about disadvantaged businesses they are usually talking about ethnic-minority, women, LGBTQ+ and veteran-owned businesses. These populations are often challenged in terms of …

By Nika White

7 WAYS TO CREATE ECONOMIC INCLUSION FOR MINORITY-OWNED BUSINESSES

Inclusive economics is the concept of ensuring that those who are part of historically disenfranchised, marginalized and disadvantaged communities have the same opportunity to engage in capitalism and successful entrepreneurship. When people speak about disadvantaged businesses they are usually talking about ethnic-minority, women, LGBTQ+ and veteran-owned businesses. These populations are often challenged in terms of the lack of economic inclusion and opportunity.
 
Typically, the reason this disadvantage occurs is because access is difficult to capital, key networks, experience, mentors and a business knowledge base. These are all necessary support systems to launch, grow and sustain a business. If you are in those disadvantaged communities, finding someone to coach you, engage you or answer your questions may be difficult.

MEN OF COLOR: LEADERSHIP AND THE IMPACT OF OPPORTUNITY

It’s a fact. The majority of Fortune 500 CEOs are white. Data and other key factors suggest businesses and organizations still have a long way to go in increasing racial diversity at the C-suite level. There is one key area of diversity that is often overlooked—men of color in leadership positions. The diversity of men …

By LaSonya Berry

MEN OF COLOR: LEADERSHIP AND THE IMPACT OF OPPORTUNITY

It’s a fact. The majority of Fortune 500 CEOs are white. Data and other key factors suggest businesses and organizations still have a long way to go in increasing racial diversity at the C-suite level. There is one key area of diversity that is often overlooked—men of color in leadership positions. The diversity of men in leadership roles is not getting the attention that it should as we strive to increase the positive impact in the community and economy.
 
According to data from executive staffing firm Crist Kolder Associates, the majority of Fortune 500 CEOs are white despite an increase in minorities moving into CEO positions. The report stated the growth of CEOs of color occurred with Asian and Latino hires yet, Black CEOs still stand at five representatives. Men of color represent approximately 10% of the C-suite despite minorities becoming the largest representation of the population in the country. The gaps in leadership by men of color among the most visible and influential organizations are quite apparent.

DISCRIMINATION’S DIRTIEST WORD—AGEISM

A look at one-half of the double dose of discrimination women face with gender and ageism. Ageism is a human issue. Ageism is a family issue. Ageism is a financial issue. Ageism is a political issue. Ageism is your issue. Ageism is our issue. Mark Twain wrote “life would be infinitely happier if we could …

By Marjorie Solomon

DISCRIMINATION’S DIRTIEST WORD—AGEISM

A look at one-half of the double dose of discrimination women face with gender and ageism.

Ageism is a human issue. Ageism is a family issue. Ageism is a financial issue. Ageism is a political issue. Ageism is your issue. Ageism is our issue.

Mark Twain wrote “life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of 80 and gradually approach 18.” The ancient Greek poet Homer called old age “loathsome,” and William Shakespeare called it “hideous winter.” Each scholar wrote their descriptions of old age while in their twilight years, leaving a legacy of loathing for aging. Over thousands of years we’ve learned to see old age as a disease, something to be avoided even though we know it’s inevitable. Which brings us back to today and the most insidious discrimination of our time—ageism.

SUPPLIER DIVERSITY: MORE THAN COUNTING THE SPEND

One message was made clear at the fourth annual Economic Impact Summit hosted in November by global biopharmaceutical company Merck & Co.: Supplier diversity is not about counting the spend, it’s about making the spend count And when that spend surpasses $2 billion, as it did in 2018, making it count in terms of innovation, …

By David M. Garcia

SUPPLIER DIVERSITY: MORE THAN COUNTING THE SPEND

One message was made clear at the fourth annual Economic Impact Summit hosted in November by global biopharmaceutical company Merck & Co.: Supplier diversity is not about counting the spend, it’s about making the spend count And when that spend surpasses $2 billion, as it did in 2018, making it count in terms of innovation, environmental sustainability and economic development is serious business.
 
“When it comes to diversity and inclusion, what’s important to us at Merck is not only the economic inclusion and supplier diversity process, it’s about having an economic impact,” said Senior Vice President and Chief Procurement Officer Quentin Roach, who opened the two-day summit “It’s about impacting the communities in which we live and work every day, and using our work, our spend and our engagement with the supplier community to help foster growth in those communities. It’s also about innovation and invention, which is what our company is all about.”

PHILANTHROPY + SUPPLIER DIVERSITY = SUCCESS FOR ALL

Personal involvement plays a vital role in Office Depot’s continuing efforts to embrace and spread diversity. With so much going on in the world these days, it seems now, more than ever, many of us are looking for ways to positively impact our communities. We understand the value and significance of giving back. In 2018, …

By Charmain Lewis

PHILANTHROPY + SUPPLIER DIVERSITY = SUCCESS FOR ALL

Personal involvement plays a vital role in Office Depot’s continuing efforts to embrace and spread diversity.

With so much going on in the world these days, it seems now, more than ever, many of us are looking for ways to positively impact our communities. We understand the value and significance of giving back. In 2018, Office Depot launched a new community investment initiative called #depotdifference, which allows their employees to do just that.

“As our company continues to change and evolve in exciting ways, so too has the way in which we support the communities where we live and do business. #depotdifference brings an employee-centric, hands-on approach to empower us all to make a difference through robust employee volunteerism and philanthropic giving,” said Alex Price, national director of community investment for Office Depot, Inc.

UNLOCKING GREATNESS—ONE WOMAN’S TICKET TO FULFILLING HER DREAMS

Zenja Norful-Glass, or “Z” as she is called, knows a thing or two about building something from the ground up. She and her two younger siblings were raised by a single mom who wasn’t much older than they were. Originally in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, when Z was still a small girl, her mom made the …

By Jamie Crump

UNLOCKING GREATNESS—ONE WOMAN’S TICKET TO FULFILLING HER DREAMS

Zenja Norful-Glass, or “Z” as she is called, knows a thing or two about building something from the ground up. She and her two younger siblings were raised by a single mom who wasn’t much older than they were. Originally in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, when Z was still a small girl, her mom made the decision to leave an abusive relationship. The police picked them up and took them to the bus station. She remembers her mom asking the guy at the bus counter where the next bus was going to and he said, “Milwaukee, Wisconsin.” “Then that’s where we are going,” her mom said.
 
Against the odds, the young family built a life in Wisconsin. It wasn’t easy and sometimes they moved around a lot. “I remember reciting the addresses for the 22 places we had lived in one year to a family member and she began to cry,” Glass recalls. “That confused me because, as a child, you don’t realize you’re not living like everyone else.”

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